Tesla Files by Steve Wachner (PDF)

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Academia – A three letter star sign a******

Zatyricon – The performer hands a small fortune telling card to the participant after chatting with them for a few moments. Not only does the fortune card predict what is going to happen next, but it accurately predicts something personal about the spectator later on when they’re home. The prediction is printed on the card, not written. The spectator is completely impressed. While this can work with Peter Turner’s fortune cookie, it is a different idea. Includes other ideas to make spectator’s WANT your business cards and even templates to create these yourself.

Pop Lockin’ Beats – “I’ve always wondered if other people were able to do the things I do.” The performer writes down his ATM PIN (or his bike lock combination, phone PIN code, etc) and guides the spectator to guessing it. Very quick reverse PIN that impresses everyone. As with many reverse PIN reveals this won’t work 100% of the time. However, a full routine structure is given in order to use this PIN to harvest additional information from your spectator, turning a close-up set into a SHOW.

More Impressive Ploy – Inspired by Watkins’ “Severance”, this principle causes billets to be made nearly useless in the minds of your audience while making the routine appear more casual and impressive. Includes multiple presentations as well as how to utilize this completely propless. A stand-out principle from the book and a favorite of many of the performers this was previewed to.

Night Flight to Rio – A spectator is given the choice of one of two opaque envelopes and told that each contains a postcard. They can choose whichever one they want (truly) and they are not marked. The spectator is taught how to use their intuition to reveal details of the postcard inside. A nice opener or casual piece that is designed so that it can never outright fail.

The Man Who Fooled Edison – A devious blend of principles comes together to create a fantastic version of the Bert Reese three billet routine. No extra billets are used. The routine naturally builds. The principles used help each other out to make them easier and more deceptive.

Serendipitous – After a few moments with a particular group the performer places their wallet on a table and begins to tell a story of serendipity. The story builds up to a slip of paper found in the performer’s wallet (it can even be taken out by the spectator). On the paper is seen to be the birthdate of the participant, their ATM PIN or some other important set of numbers. The slip of paper isn’t necessarily a prediction, but a piece of the story itself. While a method is mentioned, it is not fully detailed as it is a standard method. Presentation and structure